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What is the proper approach when taking a lead off 2nd base?

lead off second base

I like taking a simple approach. Take the largest lead where you know you can get back to the bag safely if the pitcher throws over. Usually, this is two steps and a dive. Too many young ballplayers are overly concerned about where the shortstop and 2nd baseman are playing. I see many players extending and shortening their lead based on what they see and instructions screamed from base coaches or the bench. I call it bouncing.

There are situations that warrant extended leads, but in general I like my players to take the same lead every time. Don’t worry about the fielders. The pitcher has the ball. He is the only player who can get you out. Adjusting your lead causes two very bad habits:

1. Taking your eye off the pitcher-Do not look back at the fielders when you are off the base.
2. Shifting your weight towards 2nd base- When you bounce back and forth depending upon the positioning of the fielders, you run the risk of shifting your weight back towards 2nd base. You are going to have a very difficult time scoring on a base hit or even advancing to third on a grounder if your weight is directed towards 2nd base. If I’m a pitcher and I see the runner at 2nd base shift their weight back towards the base, that is a great time for me to start my delivery.

Rather than trying to gain an advantage by bouncing, use a secondary lead to put yourself in a position to advance and score. When the pitcher commits to the plate, take two aggressive crow hops as your secondary lead. Then, react to the situation. This approach will put you in a good position to score on a base hit, advance on a hit ball or ball in the dirt, and you do not run the risk of being picked off.

How do you take leads off second base?

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